« Act quickly to defuse asbestos `time bomb' | トップページ | Believing in the future of our mother tongue »

2005年7月14日 (木)

Bid-rigging lexicon speaks loudly about Japan

 僕は英辞郎を使って英語を読みまくり、インターネットラジオのNHKのラジオジャパン英語ニュースで時事英語を聞きまくってます。(^^;また、VOAでヴォイスレコーダーにDLしたMP3音声とテキストも楽しんでます。
参考「こんな感じで英辞郎を使ってます

Bid-rigging lexicon speaks loudly about Japan

07/14/2005

A feature of the second edition of the Random House English-Japanese Dictionary, published by Shogakukan, is that it offers a list of words of Japanese origin that are used by English speakers. It puts together about 900 Japanese words that have appeared in authoritative American and British dictionaries of the English language or dictionaries of new words used in English.

2005年07月13日(水曜日)付
【天声人語】

 ランダムハウス英和大辞典(小学館)の2版には、「日本語から借用された英語」が載っている。英米の主要辞書や新語辞典などに見られる英語化した日本語で、約900語にのぼる。

The alphabetically arranged list ranges from words like tsunami, kimono and hara-kiri (committing suicide by cutting open the abdomen), which entered the English lexicon in the 19th century, continuing up to 1990s words.

Going over the list, one feels as if reading a history of shifts in interest about Japan. The list may also be taken as mirroring the way Japan has presented itself to the outside world.

 ツナミ、キモノ、ハラキリといった19世紀以来の古いものから、1990年代のものまでがアルファベット順に並んでいる。単語を拾っていると、それらは、日本に投げかけられてきたまなざしの変遷のようであり、日本が外に対して見せてきた姿のようでもある。

Among the words from the 1990s, my eyes were arrested by keiretsu (interlocking business ties) and dango (bid-rigging), because of their close and time-honored association with the way business is done in Japan.

These are words that make one understand why the Japanese economy is robust, why Japanese corporations often shut out outsiders, and why shady business practices persist.

 90年代に登場したという語の中に、日本の古くからの経済のありように絡むものが二つ、目に付いた。keiretsu(系列)、そしてdango(談合)である。日本経済の強さや閉鎖性、不明朗性を感じさせる言葉なのだろう。

In a bid-rigging scandal over steel bridge projects, a retired director of Japan Highway Public Corp. was arrested Tuesday along with four other men for allegedly playing key roles in fixing bids for orders placed by the state-run company.

A former adviser to one of the companies involved, the suspect is said to have had the cooperation of other former Japan Highway officials who landed cushy post-retirement jobs in the industry.

Operating from an "amity society" of retired Japan Highway officials, members allegedly gathered unannounced information on scheduled orders from Japan Highway branch offices across the country.

 日本道路公団が発注する鋼鉄製橋梁(きょうりょう)工事の談合事件を巡り、元公団理事で、受注調整をしたとされる会社の元顧問らが逮捕された。天下りした公団OBの親睦(しんぼく)団体のメンバーが、全国の公団支社から未発表の工事発注予定を集めていたという。

The scandal shows how deeply bid-rigging is entrenched in this country. But Hiroshi Okuda, chairman of Nippon Keidanren (Japan Business Federation), was unexpectedly tolerant about the dango problem at a news conference. "It's something like a custom you find everywhere in Japan," he said.

Perhaps he was not specifically talking about the bid-rigging scandal over steel bridge projects. Even so, when I heard it, I could not help shaking my head in disbelief.

 dangoの根深さを思わせる事件だが、日本経団連の奥田会長は、談合問題について「全国津々浦々に行きわたっている慣習のようなもの」と、記者会見で述べた。橋梁談合事件を念頭に置いた発言とは思えないが、首をかしげざるを得ない。

I fear that a statement by Japan's top business leader, dismissing bid-rigging as if it were something irrelevant, just when a major bid-rigging case is about to be unraveled, could spawn misunderstandings at home and abroad.

My hope is that Okuda will watch his words if only to keep tsutsu uraura (everywhere in Japan) from being added to the list of Japanese words used by English speakers.

 大がかりな談合の罪が解明されようとしている時である。財界トップによる他人事(ひとごと)のような言い方は、内外から誤解を招かないだろうか。「tsutsu・uraura」が、借用語に載るようなことがないように願いたい。

--The Asahi Shimbun, July 13(IHT/Asahi: July 14,2005)

|

« Act quickly to defuse asbestos `time bomb' | トップページ | Believing in the future of our mother tongue »

コメント

コメントを書く



(ウェブ上には掲載しません)


コメントは記事投稿者が公開するまで表示されません。



トラックバック


この記事へのトラックバック一覧です: Bid-rigging lexicon speaks loudly about Japan:

« Act quickly to defuse asbestos `time bomb' | トップページ | Believing in the future of our mother tongue »