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2005/08/23

For war-displaced, the scars never heal

 僕は英辞郎を使って英語を読みまくり、インターネットラジオのNHKのラジオジャパン英語ニュースで時事英語を聞きまくってます。(^^;また、VOAでヴォイスレコーダーにDLしたMP3音声とテキストも楽しんでます。
参考「こんな感じで英辞郎を使ってます

For war-displaced, the scars never heal

08/17/2005

Dainari Adachi was a 12-year-old middle school student in occupied Manchuria when World War II ended. His family lived in a small town near the border of the Soviet Union. On the day word arrived that Emperor Hirohito, posthumously known as Emperor Showa, had admitted defeat in the war, he was playing outdoors as usual.

When Dainari returned to his home, his mother told him that Japan had lost the war. He was too young to know what that meant in practical terms.

2005年08月16日(火曜日)付
【天声人語】

 安達大成(だいなり)さんは「終戦の日」を旧満州で迎えた。12歳の中学生だった。ソ連との国境に近い小さな街で、いつものように外で遊んでいた。家に帰ると、母親から「戦争に負けた」と知らされた。えっ、それ何、という感じだった。

A few days later, Soviet warplanes appeared over the town. One shot at the boy without warning, and he fled into nearby woods. "Although the war had ended in Japan, you might say the war actually started for me on that day," he recalls.

 その数日後、ソ連の飛行機が現れた。上空からいきなり機銃で撃たれ、林の中に逃げた。安達さんは「日本では戦争が終わっていたが、私にとっては、この日から戦争が始まったようなものです」と話す。

Soon, Soviet ground troops arrived. Dainari's father, a civil engineer, had died of illness several months before. With his mother and two younger brothers, Dainari was moved through a succession of internment camps. During this period, his youngest brother, a 2-year-old, died while being carried on his mother's back.

Food was scarce. It occurred to young Dainari that if he were not around, his mother and other brother would have more to eat. He left without saying even goodbye.

 まもなく、ソ連軍が街にやって来た。土木技師だった父は数カ月前に病死していた。母と2人の弟とともに収容所を転々とさせられる。その途中で、2歳だった下の弟は、母に背負われたまま死んだ。食べものにも事欠いた。自分がいなければ2人が助かる。そう考えた少年は黙って姿を消した。それが母や弟との長い別れとなる。

The boy found work on a frontier farm. Early in his 20s, he met his future wife, a woman named Motoko.

Motoko was the daughter of a Japanese farmer who had settled in the former Manchuria. She had fled with her mother from the invading Soviet forces. After her mother died, she was raised by Chinese foster parents.

It was not until 36 years after the end of World War II that the two war-displaced Japanese who married in China set foot in their mother country.

 辺境の農場で働き、20代の初めに出会ったのが妻の素子さんだ。素子さんは開拓農民の娘だった。母と一緒にソ連軍の侵攻から逃げたが、母は亡くなり、中国人の養父母に育てられた。異郷で結ばれた2人の残留孤児が母国の地を踏んだのは、終戦から36年後だった。

At the surrender, about 1.5 million Japanese were living in the former Manchuria. In the turmoil that followed, at least 200,000 are estimated to have died in raids by Soviet troops and Chinese residents, group "suicides," illness and other circumstances.

Their stories graphically illustrate how the wheels of fortune turned in different ways for these individuals, according to where they were on Aug. 15, 1945.

 旧満州には約150万人の日本人が住んでいた。そのうち、ソ連軍や地元民の襲撃、集団自決、病気などで、約20万人が死んだといわれる。同じ日本人でも、どこで「終戦の日」を迎えたかで、運命は変わった。

Today, Adachi and his wife live in Chiba Prefecture on a 60,000-yen monthly pension. His wife cannot speak Japanese. Being five years her senior, the husband wonders anxiously, "If I die before my wife does, what will become of her?"

 安達さん夫妻はいま、千葉県で月に6万円の年金で暮らす。妻は日本語が話せない。5歳年上の夫は「私が先に死んだらどうなるのか」と心配する。

--The Asahi Shimbun, Aug. 16(IHT/Asahi: August 17,2005)

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